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Recognized as the 2017 #1 global voice for Education on LinkedIn media network, Heather McGowan is an internationally known speaker, writer, and thought leader. McGowan prepares leaders to most-effectively react to rapid and disruptive changes in education, work, and society. As a Future of Work Strategist, Heather has worked with diverse teams to address these challenges. Recognizing that business innovation begins with education, specifically learning faster than your competition, she has worked with university presidents and corporate human resources managers to prepare both graduates and workers for jobs that do not yet exist. She was the strategic architect of the Kanbar College of Design, Engineering, and Commerce at Philadelphia University (now Jefferson), the first undergraduate college explicitly focused on innovation. At Becker College, she crafted the Agile Mindset learning framework used to prepare students to work in an uncertain future. She assists corporate executives in rethinking their business models, teams, and organizational structures to become resilient in changing markets while helping academic, nonprofit, and foundation leadership rethink education and philanthropy. Her clients range from start-ups to publicly traded, Fortune 500 companies, including Autodesk, Citi, The World Bank, and BD Medical. Often quoted in the media, notably by NYT columnist Thomas L Friedman for her thought leadership in the Future of Work, McGowan also serves on the advisory board for Sparks & Honey, a New York-based culture-focused agency focused on the future for brands.

Heather provides keynotes for organizations all over the world and engages in advisory and, with her colleagues provides bespoke consulting to help organizations adapt to the 4th industrial revolution. Her think tank is called Work to Learn because McGowan believes that in the 3rd industrial revolution we learned in order to work and now, in the fourth industrial revolution, we will work in order to learn (continuously). The Future of Work is Learning.